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Aldouran Glen

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Scottish woodland doesn't come much lusher than at Aldouran Glen: a shady oasis of semi-natural forest where wild garlic flourishes, red squirrels (apparently) scamper between tree trunks, and sun rarely penetrates through the canopy above. The narrow strip of greenery following the Aldouran Burn from west to east is the most rewarding part, and can be accessed either from a car park at the upper end or (as we did) via Aldouran Wetland Garden to the east. The Woodland Trust also advertise an iron age hill fort on high groud to the north, but this isn't worth the effort required to reach it: overgrown, tick-infested paths and thick vegetation obscuring any views.


Name: Aldouran Glen★★☆☆☆
Location (upper, western car park): G.R.: NX 006635 / flamenco waddle wasp
Open: Always
Cost: Free
Anything else? Paths within the glen are clear but narrow and a little muddy. It's just under a mile's walk between the west and east car parks, so double that for a return journey.

Aldouran Wetland Garden

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Aldouran Wetland Garden is a hidden gem in the quiet northern half of the Rhins of Galloway, largely undiscovered by tourists (until now?). The garden was created by a community effort in or around 2005 and is a real labour of love, especially when you take into account the small size of the village. The site splits into several separate zones, including a sensory garden, large ponds and a sculpture trail. At its western edge, wetland gradually morphs into a wilder woodland zone, and finally into Aldouran Glen, separately managed by the Woodland Trust. This is well worth a visit in itself, or you could easily combine the two - the paths join up.


Name: Aldouran Wetland Garden★★☆☆☆
Location: Off B7043, west side of Leswalt, G.R.: NX 016638 / rebounds grace ratio
Open: Always
Cost: Free


Galdenoch Castle

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The unloved ruin of Galdenoch Castle is found on the northern arm of the Rhins of Galloway peninsula, a few miles west of the village of Leswalt. This L-plan tower house dates to 1547, as evidenced by a plaque on the eastern side, and still nearly stands to its original height. Now here's the catch: the last part of the drive to it is along an excruciatingly sharp, stony track with a worryingly high camber. Worth it? Just about, though if you end up with a puncture you might disagree.


Name: Galdenoch Castle ★☆☆☆☆
Location: End of track to Meikle Galdenoch, off B738 3 miles west of Leswalt, G.R.: NW 974632 / playing parsnips dividing
Open: Always (exterior only)
Cost: Free
Anything else? The last half-mile to the castle is along a rough track with sharp stones and quite a high camber - not recommended for vehicles with low ground clearance.

Chapel Finian

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Chapel Finian is the westernmost of a whole host of slightly obscure historical sites dotted around the Machars and cared for by Historic Scotland. Like St Ninian's Chapel at Isle of Whithorn, it probably used to serve pilgrims coming ashore here on their way to Whithorn Priory, where Christianity was first established in Scotland. You have to wonder why they landed here though - 12 long miles away. Surely it would've been easier to make landfall closer to Whithorn itself? A millennium after it was built in the 900's or 1000's AD, little remains above about knee level; basically all you can make out is the shape of the building and neighboring well. But it's right next to a main road and therefore easily added to an itinerary.


Name: Chapel Finian★☆☆☆☆
Location: A747 5 miles north-west of Port William, G.R.: NX 278489 / loose gloves ripen
Open: Always
Cost: Free

Druchtag Motte

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A prominent mound looms over the country lane heading north from Mochrum village. The shape is unmistakable: it can only be a defensive motte left over from the period pre-dating stone castles. Druchtag Motte has been dated to the 12th or 13th century, and probably housed a timber castle on its summit. Though aided by a rope, the way up onto the motte is alarmingly steep, with the ascent surely quite a feat if the grass is wet. At least the defences are clearly still doing their job!


Name: Druchtag Motte★☆☆☆☆
Location: Minor road just north of Mochrum, G.R.: NX 349467 / flick actual fairy
Open: Always
Cost: Free
Anything else? Parking by the entrance is tight, so it might be best to park in Mochrum village just to the south.


Barsalloch Fort

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Like nearby Rispain Camp, Barsalloch Fort is believed to be an iron age farmstead, inhabited by the Novantae tribe and moated to defend against outsiders. Compare the two farmsteads and Barsalloch is smaller than its counterpart, with the broad ditch enclosing a roughly semicircular area measuring about 40 metres at its widest point. The views for visitors are much better than at Rispain Camp, however: a wonderful vista over Luce Bay, with the Isle of Man on the horizon.


Name: Barsalloch Fort★☆☆☆☆
Location: A747 a mile west of Monreith, G.R.: NX 347412 / likes grief reach
Open: Always
Cost: Free


Rispain Camp

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Rispain Camp is a set of prominent earthworks forming an almost perfect rectangle on a low hill not far from Whithorn and its famous priory. Its original purpose has been subject to a lot of debate over the years. Once believed to be a Roman Fort, archaeologists' opinion shifted to the idea of a medieval site before settling on the current theory: an even older, iron age farmstead inhabited by the Novantae tribe between about 100 and 200 BC. The inner space measures 70 metres by 50 and once included at least three roundhouses; these were all enclosed by a ditch originally six metres high, except for an entrance causeway on the north side (which you approach from today) which used to feature a timber gate.


Name: Rispain Camp★☆☆☆☆
Location: Minor road end a mile east of Whithorn, G.R.: NX 429399 / cadet skirt brave
Open: Always
Cost: Free