Walk: Sgurr na Banachdich & a ridge (not?) too far

Skye | Black Cuillin | Full day walk | ★★★★★

[Sgurr nan Gobhar (centre) offers an exciting descent option for scramblers]

The Cuillin Ridge strikes fear into many a hillwalker: one look at the range from Sligachan and it's obvious why so many people hire a guide. However, Sgurr na Banachdich is technically no more difficult than most mainland Munros, with no scrambling on the ascent route described below. Descending via Sgurr nan Gobhar is great fun if you fancy putting your hands to work a bit. Otherwise, return by the ascent route. It hardly needs to be said that the views are sensational from the start - and just keep improving.

[Superlative views all-round from Sgurr nan Banachdich - this is looking south along the ridge towards Sgurr Dearg]

📌 Walk: Sgurr na Banachdich & a ridge (not?) too far ★★★★★
Start / finish at layby at SYHA Glenbrittle (gets full), Skye, G.R.: NG 409225 ///standing.shatters.exhaled

▶ 8 km / 5 mi | ▲ 970 m | ⌚ Full day | Tough
Summits: Sgurr na Banachdich (965 m, Munro); Sgurr nan Gobhar (630 m)
Terrain: Well-made path along burn at first, fainter and occasionally wet across to Coir' an Eich. Steep ascent on grass then small scree runs to An Diallaid, then choice of rough paths on bare rock to Munro summit. On descent, Sgurr nan Gobhar ridge involves several short but fairly straightforward scrambles - each slightly more difficult than the last, but never serious. Steep scree run off Sgurr nan Gobhar, then pathless moorland to regain outward route near start.

Route & map

Layby - Allt a' Choire Ghreadaidh to Allt-Coir' an Eich - Coir' an Eich - An Diallaid - Sgurr na Banachdich - Sgurr nan Gobhar - descent via southwest slope - start


Route credit: Walkhighlands (modified)

On our visit

Wildlife: Sheep lower down; unidentified bird of prey above Coire na Banachdich.
Weather: Nearly unbroken, warm sunshine, with the odd low cloud floating in Coire na Banachdich. Light, cooling northerly wind.

[The entire Sgurr nan Gobhar ridge is visible here - most of the scrambling is on the middle section]

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